Developers and landowners run rings around Councils

                                    Together developers and landowners aim and are succeeding to minimise the percentage of affordable housing units  

Viability assessment and affordable housing

The most controversial implication of viability assessment is its impact on local authority affordable housing policies under section 106 agreements. This refers to a local authority planning obligations for a standard percentage of affordable housing from housing developments of more than 10 housing units. Given that for most local authorities this had become the principal means by which affordable housing could be delivered, it was of major concern (ref.) Many local authorities require 30%-40% of all new housing on large sites to be affordable i.e. sub-market housing usually bought and managed by a housing association. From a landowner point of view any reduction of the maximum amount of market housing on his site reduces the price of his land and reduces his incentive to sell to a developer. The developer on the other hand, is not usually willing to reduce his profitability; he will move to another site where he can achieve his benchmark profit level.

Thus, together developers and landowners aim to minimise the percentage of affordable units as far as possible; and viability assessment provides a means for them to do this. If they can show that the value of a completed development with the required policy percentage of affordable housing minus the costs of the scheme produces a land value that is below their benchmark, the scheme can be deemed unviable. Under the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), the planning authority will then be required to reduce its planning obligations for affordable housing until they reach the profit benchmark of the developer.    READ MORE:  Tensions_Viability_paper_viability_2015

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It’s time to call time on ‘Right to Buy’

It’s time to call time on ‘Right to Buy’

The policy, introduced by Margaret Thatcher in 1980, has been blamed for causing a shortage of social housing.

The previous Labour government substantially cut the discounts available under the Right to Buy scheme but never fully abolished it.

The Conservatives, however, reinvigorated the policy in their first term in coalition, causing a further wave of sell-offs.

Far from boosting home ownership, figures produced by the House of Commons Communities and Local Government Committee in February last year found that 40 per cent of flats sold off under the scheme were now in the hands of private landlords.

Northampton housing campaigners say:

The next Labour government MUST abolish it.

It has already been scrapped by the Welsh and Scottish governments.

The fact that few council homes have been replaced, and never on a like-for-like basis, is the most damaging long-term legacy of the right-to-buy policy.

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ADAMS gives NPH & NBC a rest

ADAMS gives NPH & NBC a rest…

READERS of English Housing Survey – Social Rented Sector Report that was released in the last few days needs to be read with care?

Norman says “In July 2017 the government published a report that is NOT factual and the facts are:

In May 2015, the eligibility criteria was reduced from five years public sector tenancy to three. This means you now have to be a tenant for three years instead of five before you can apply to buy your home.

 

He as email the publishers the following:

RE: July 2017 ISBN: 978-1-4098-5085-4

 

English Housing Survey Social Rented Sector Report, 2015-16

DRAW your attention to the following:

Technical notes and glossary page 31

Right to Buy scheme: The Right to Buy scheme gives secure tenants in a local authority home the opportunity to buy their home at a discount. In order to qualify for the scheme a social tenant must have lived for a total of at least five years in a public sector tenancy. The scheme is also available to assured tenants of non-charitable housing associations who have transferred with their homes from a local authority as part of a stock transfer. In this case the tenants is said to have a ‘preserved Right to Buy’. The Government has plans to extend Right to Buy to housing association tenants and are currently running a Voluntary Right to Buy pilot scheme amongst a small number of housing associations

 

My understanding is that it’s a total of THREE years

Mr Norman Adams – Northampton

END

Technical notes and glossary page 31 don’t trust them? Social_rented_sector_report_2015-16

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 Right to Buy – The proportion who expected to buy their current home increased to 47%

English Housing Survey –  Right to Buy – The proportion who expected to buy their current home increased to 47%

Buying expectations

  • Among social renters who expected to buy a property, the proportion who expected to buy their current home increased from 35% in 2010-11 to 47% in 2015-16      Social_rented_sector_report_2015-16
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About half of households in the social rented sector had at least one member with a long-term illness or disability

Because of the way social housing is allocated, the sector houses more vulnerable groups than other sectors.

 

  • About half (49%) of households in the social rented sector had at least one member with a long-term illness or disability. This is noticeably higher than in other tenures: 29% of owner occupier households and 23% of private renter households fell into this category.
  • The social rented sector also has a higher proportion of lone parents than other sectors; and almost three quarters (72%) of social renters were in the two lowest income quintiles.

Read more at Social_rented_sector_report_2015-16

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Housing Revenue Account will take a hit for Northampton Partnership Homes to move to the St. Peter’s Way site.

Housing Revenue Account will take a hit for Northampton Partnership Homes to move to the St. Peter’s Way site.

Northampton Defend Council Housing notes: 

Northampton Partnership Homes have confirmed that they will relocate to the National Grid Site B and pay a commercial rent, understands that the proposed relocation would represent an additional cost to the Housing Revenue Account that Northampton Partnership Homes will produce operational efficiency savings to offset the forecast additional revenue cost to the HRA from its Management Fee

The Council will want to satisfy itself that the proposed purchase works in value for money terms for both the General Fund and the Housing Revenue Account. Further work completed supports that this will be the case for the General Fund but not for the Housing Revenue Account

NPH have confirmed that they wish to proceed with the relocation and they will be responsible for identifying the necessary level of revenue savings and efficiencies.

Intention to Hold Part of the Meeting in Private

There is an intention to hold part of the meeting in private – Item 16 -Land off St Peter’s Way: Evaluation of Business Case – (Private Appendix)

Exempt Information means information falling within the following seven categories outlined in schedule 12A of the Local Government Act 1972: Part 1

Item 16 – Land off St Peter’s Way: Evaluation of Business Case – Private Appendix contains sensitive commercial information relating to a firm or individual can be found within the appendix. Therefore, it has been exempted under schedule 12A, Part 1, (3) “Information relating to the financial or business affairs of any particular person (including the authority holding that information)”.

Land off St Peters Way Evaluation of Business Case  

Appendix 1 – CR Land St Peters Way Site Plan 201216

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23 St John’s House in St Andrew’s Street, Spring Boroughs

23 St John’s House in St Andrew’s Street, Spring Boroughs

 

Officers sealed off 23 St John’s House in St Andrew’s Street, Spring Boroughs, on Friday, using powers under the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act.

“Northampton magistrates imposed the order following repeated incidents of anti-social behaviour and criminal activity over the past few months,” a police spokeswoman said. “The premises will now be closed for three months prohibiting the tenant or any visitors from entering the address.”

Read more at: http://www.northamptonchron.co.uk/news/northampton-drug-den-that-left-neighbours-afraid-to-leave-their-homes-is-shut-down-1-8049138

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